As we chat with training gym owners for the January enrollment of the Unicorn Society, I’ve been reflecting on the differences between those who just get by and those who thrive. 

(Want to learn more about the Unicorn Society? Go HERE.)

Listen, this can be tough biz. And we can’t totally discount luck.

However, we should focus on what we CAN control.

Here’s my observations about what sets the “Super-Achiever” training gym owners apart.

15 Traits of High Performing Training Gym Owners

  • They’re genuinely excellent at the services they offer. This doesn’t necessarily mean the finer points of program design and technical coaching (though it can, and ideally does). But at the very least, great training gym owners create an awesome training experience.
  • They understand and empathize with what a typical client actually wants. Their focus is not on their own particular interests in training, methodologies, tools, status with other coaches, etc.
  • They take the time to regularly fill their cup physiologically. This includes: taking time away from the business to rest, working out consistently, eating well, getting regular sleep, etc. In other words, doing what they advise their clients. 🙂
  • They take the time to regularly fill their cup psychologically. This includes: reflecting on how their work expresses meaningful personal values, connecting with loved ones, creating a compelling vision of their future, etc. 
  • They’re as interested in business as they are in training and program design.
  • They’re as interested (or more!) in their clients as in they are in training and program design.
  • They do not fear money. They understand their business finances, their personal finances, and they have clearly articulated financial goals for both.
  • They devote time, money, and energy to education via conferences, books, courses, coaching, etc.
  • They’re willing to be honest and vulnerable about where they and their business may be struggling.
  • They work on unaddressed emotional blocks that get in their way via self-work modalities like therapy, coaching, journaling, plant medicine, etc.
  • They have high standards. They consistently keep their commitments, which brings them high self-esteem and a belief in their own self-efficacy.
  • They have a bias for action balanced against the ability to periodically slow down and reflect on next steps.
  • They’re not afraid of success. They know change is required for growth. This will, at times, bring criticism and judgement from family, friends, employees, and loyal long term clients who have reasons for wanting them to stay the way they are; they accept this fact.
  • They value excellence, even when it means making the hard changes to their business needs.
  • They know the very skills and attributes that brought them praise and any success they’ve had so far may be the very attributes preventing them from getting to the next level.

I believe in you!

Mark

PS If the above sounds like you — or who you want to become — you may be a fit for the Unicorn Society.

To find out more, go HERE.